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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

1 edition of Black turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus terebrans) found in the catalog.

Black turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus terebrans)

by Southern Forest Experiment Station (New Orleans, La.)

  • 43 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published in New Orleans .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dendroctonus terebrans

  • Edition Notes

    Rev. Oct. 1956 by Division of Forest Insect Research.

    ContributionsBennett, William H.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination3 l.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25934152M

    Bookworm is a general name for any insect that is said to bore through books.. The damage to books that is commonly attributed to "bookworms" is, in truth, not caused by any species of , the larvae of various types of insects including beetles, moths and cockroaches, which may bore or chew through books seeking food, are such larvae exhibit a superficial resemblance. black turpentine beetle definition in English dictionary, black turpentine beetle meaning, synonyms, see also 'Black',Black',Black',black art'. Enrich your vocabulary with the English Definition dictionary.

    Black turpentine beetle infestations after thinning in a loblolly pine plantation. New Orleans, La.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station, (OCoLC) The black turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus terebrans) is the largest of the pine beetles and is most often a secondary pest. It can be found living in pines that have been previously infested by the southern pine beetle, freshly cut pine stumps or weakened or stressed pine trees.

    The Louisiana timber industry relies on the availability of harvestable trees. In areas affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the black turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus terebrans) contributed to the mortality of loblolly (Pinus taeda) and slash (Pinus elliottii) pine trees. This timber loss due to natural causes reduces the landowner’s earnings The BTB girdles the cambium layer of pines. The black turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus terebrans Olivier is the largest pine-infesting bark beetle native to the southern and eastern United States. It generally reproduces in fresh stumps and bases of trees weakened or killed by other biotic or abiotic agents, although it can also infest and sometimes kills apparently healthy trees.


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Black turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus terebrans) by Southern Forest Experiment Station (New Orleans, La.) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Dendroctonus terebrans, the black turpentine beetle, is a species of bark beetle native to the eastern United States. Its larvae tunnel under the bark of pine trees, weakening and sometimes killing the trees. Description. This is the largest bark beetle in the southeastern United States, with an adult length of 5 to 8 mm ( to in).

Class: Insecta. The black turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus terebrans, is robust, brownish to black with a barrel-shaped body, 5 ⁄ 16 to almost 3 ⁄ 8 inch long (the largest of the bark beetles attacking pine in North Carolina).

There is no description of the egg. The larva is a legless, brown-headed grub. When full grown, the 1 ⁄ 2-inch long grub has brown bumps along each side of its body. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Black Turpentine Beetle Importance: Attacks from black turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus terebrans) are observed on all pines native to the South. It is most serious in pine naval stores and pines stressed by serious drought, flooding, storms, wildfires, and cutting operations.

Black turpentine beetles are small, black, oval shaped and good flyers. Once active in the yard, the infected tree will fill the air with turpentine beetle pheromones used to attract more.

BLACK TURPENTINE BEETLE BIOLOGY. Female beetles initiate the problem by targeting a good host tree. Once on the bark, she’ll drill a hole attempting to. The black Black turpentine beetle book beetle is one of the larger native bark beetle species, reaching 3/8” long, and is dark reddish brown to black.

Black turpentine beetles have one Black turpentine beetle book in the northern area of their range to three generations in the south. Multiple life stages and generations are often present because the insect is able to overwinter.

Black Turpentine Beetle; Common Name: Black Turpentine Beetle. Large pitch tubes at base of a tree infested by the BLACK TURPENTINE BEETLE. Other: Pine bark beetle. Species. Dendroctonus terebrans. Common Hosts: Loblolly pine Pinus taeda Longleaf pine Pinus palustris Pond pine Pinus serotina Sand pine Pinus clausa Shortleaf pine Pinus echinata.

Oynx became registered for use in Florida in late It is labeled for use as a trunk spray to prevent attacks by pine bark beetles (including Southern Pine Beetle (SPB), Black Turpentine.

Figure 3.—Life stages of the black turpentine beetle. F Figure 2.—Fine white boring dust fromam- brosia beetle boring in base of pine treeat- tacked by black turpentine beetles. somewhat fanshaped, is made. The gallery may be as much as 12 inches across. When the larvae near maturity, they construct pupal cells between.

The boring of the black turpentine beetles causes resin to flow, harden and produce the characteristic pitch tubes, which are usually seen on the lower 4 to 5 feet of the trunk.

The larvae, which feed on the inner bark, may completely girdle the tree. Although pitch tubes are a good indication of black turpentine beetle attack, they will. Black Turpentine Beetle.

Jenny C. Staeben. 1, Stephen Clarke. 2, and Kamal J.K. Gandhi Black turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus. terebrans (Olivier), is the largest native pine bark beetle in the southeastern United States.

This beetle is usually considered a secondary pest, as it typically colonizes freshly cut pine (Pinus spp.). Black turpentine beetle passes through four stages during its life cycle: an egg stage, a larval stage, a pupal stage, and an adult stage.

The eggs are laid in galleries that measure 1 to 12 inches long. The larvae are white, with a reddish-brown head. They are grub-like, and lack legs. The larvae can grow up to 12 mm in length. Other bark beetles that attack pine trees include the black turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus terebrans (Oliv.), and engraver beetles (Ips species).

These beetles produce superficially similar symptoms to those caused by southern pine beetles on the trunk, but. Red turpentine beetle (D. valens) or black turpentine beetle (D.

terebrans). They both attack bases of healthy, dying, injured, or felled trees and stumps. Egg galleries are Irregular, longitudinal, a few inches to several feet long, packed with frass in which eggs are laid. Most all pines are susceptible and occasionally fir, larch, and spruce.

The black turpentine beetle (Figure 1) is the largest of the pine bark beetles in Georgia. It is attracted to pines damaged by logging activities and lightning or stressed by drought (Figure 2).

As an adult, it bores under the bark and constructs feeding and egg galleries (Figure 3). Distinguishing Dangerous Bark Beetles The Black Turpentine Beetle. The resin flows only from spots at the base of the tree (rarely above 8 ft).

The flow is conspicuous (>1 in). This is the black turpentine beetle, a species that is rarely epidemic: removal recommended, but not urgent.

Monitoring of surrounding trees is critical. Black turpentine beetles bore into the inner bark of stressed or injured pines (Pinus spp.), where they breed and feed on phloem tissue.

Adults are strongly attracted to volatile pine odors and readily breed in fresh stumps. Attacks on standing trees usually occur on the lower m of the trunk or on large roots.

Light attacks may kill only. The black turpentine beetle takes three to four months to complete a single gener- ation, that is, from the time the parent beetles enter a tree or stump until the newly-formed beetles emerge.

In contrast, other southern bark beetles complete a single generation in twenty to forty days. The black turpentine beetles (Dendroctonus terebrans) is the largest pine beetle native to the while turpentine beetles are certainly tree pests, they are often considered secondary pests due to the fact that their ideal target is freshly cut pine stumps, stressed or weakened trees.

Black Turpentine Beetle. Black Turpentine Beetle, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier), is one of five common species of pine bark beetles in the southeastern United turpentine beetles bore into the inner bark of stressed or injured pines, where they breed and feed on phloem tissue.

The Black Turpentine Beetle (BTB) has previously caused an extensive amount of damage to southern states (Hurwitz, ). The BTB generally can destroy up to 10 % of a stand during a single season (Smith and Lee, ).

This rate is dependant upon.Trunk attacks by the black turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus terebrans (Oh.), and the larvae of Dioryctria amatella (Hulst) on the southern pines results in a copious flow of pitch.

This external pitch mass or pitch tube exhibits characteristics that can be used as symptoms to .The black turpentine beetle is found throughout the eastern United States from coastal New Hampshire south through Florida and west to Texas and Missouri. It is an interesting distribution since the black turpentine beetle occupies the part of the continent not occupied by the much more widespread red turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus valens.